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20130224
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Book TV 17
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CSPAN2 17
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Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17
CSPAN
Feb 16, 2013 11:00pm EST
to dianetics then he invented the religion scientology. what is it exactly? there is a lot to know about of very eccentric world view and there are many elements in scientology that soundalike science fiction because there were written by someone gave britain something similar. that you are an immortal soul. in you have lived before and you will live again scientology helps you to remember the past lifetime it is good news to a lot of people. it is called auditing. the auditor between you and your auditor there is a divide called the of e-meter would hold toucans they used to be campbell's soup there is a wire and a small, not of electricity passing through it is one-third of all lie detector the measure is your skin responses not pulsar restoration but it does do something. when you're talking to your auditor the needle is constantly registering. in scientology they think it measures the mass of your thoughts and you can see the movement with the old the painful memory to show up and if you go through this thought and traded of painful qualities then the nato will slow down and pretty s
CSPAN
Feb 17, 2013 11:00am EST
disputes, war, religion and speaking more than one language. this book is my most personal book. my books of the most practical value to our daily lives, and as a shameless author i hope they can be my best purchase book. it's about what i've learned about spending a lot of my time in traditional tribal societies over the past 50 years. and it's about what friends and other scholars have learned from other tribal societies around the world. all of us here are accustomed to living in big industrial societies, in permanent housing with governments to make decision, with writing and books and internet. where most people live past age 60, when we regulate and counter strangers just as i am encountering you this evening, and where most of our food is grown by older people, we forget that every one of those things a rosary recently in history. humans have constituted a separate line of biological evolution, about 6 million years. but all of the things i just mentioned didn't exist anywhere in the world 11,000 years ago. they rose only within the last 11,000 years, and some of them such as the i
CSPAN
Feb 18, 2013 1:00am EST
's war on terror became a global war on tribal islam" professor akbar ahmed, is a class of religion? >> guest: it is more complex. the concept of the clash of civilizations and others a simplistic. a and more than 10 years after 9/11 we should be aware of the conflicts where america is involved. i find many conflicts are rooted in the clash already taking place before and 11 was centered government and the triumph of the community on the border between states. without local history or culture it is impossible to impose simplistic notions but someone did waziristan or yemen is aghast at a clash of civilizations and. 90% had no idea what 9/11 was zero or of some of did not been. would have to be careful how we are analyzing and i maintain there is a crisis already was united states involved in a local conflict. >> host: ambassador to bases u.s. attacking their own personal try for their government? >> guest: you raised the third factor, with united states, the tribes now of the central government with a triangle of conflict that is the conflict said is often overlooked. would you incl
CSPAN
Feb 22, 2013 10:00pm EST
movement, the most powerful idea was the first one that was abandoned. there were a lot of other religions as well. the law turned against religion. it was half of the movement inspiration and half of doctor king's magnificent formula of equal service and equal votes. 1 foot in the scriptures and 1 foot in the constitution. the next thing you know. people are turning against the spiritual base of democracy. when i grow, the textbooks of the civil war had nothing to do with slavery. we have a lot of sentimental on with gone with the wind, and to this day, there are textbooks in history that refer to the political movement that oversaw the reconstruction governments and the supremacy in the south and pave the way for segregation, the textbooks refer to that movement as the redeemers. saying that redeemed this by terrorism, when it is not among us. so it hasn't the ability to turn our perception upside down. it can also turn our politics upside down. i put two chapters together in about 1964. it had a democratic convention and the republican convention. the republicans were the party of linco
CSPAN
Feb 16, 2013 8:00am EST
. the most powerful idea was the first one that was abandon, and there's the lot of others, religion. the left turned against religion. when it was half of the movement's inspiration and half of the dr. king's magnificent formula of equal souls, equal votes, one foot in the scripture, one foot in the constitution, and next thing you know, people turn against the spiritual base of democracy. we misremembered the civil war for a century. when i was growing up in atlanta, my textbook said the civil war had nothing to do with slavery, and we got a lot of sentimental gone with the wind, and to this day, there are textbooks in history that refer to the political movement that overthrew the reconstruction governments after the civil war and restored white sprem sigh in the south and paid the way for segregation, refer to the -- the textbooks refer to that movement as the redeemers. the redeemers redeemed the south, a religious word that in reality was accomplished by terror, terrorism as much as the terrorism that plagues the world we're attuned to when it's not among us. it turned -- race
CSPAN
Feb 16, 2013 7:00pm EST
about religion and politics and how so many of the views that we believe, all of us, carefully reasoned and fought out, grounded in some deeper attitudes and deeper values and deeper life experiences, what i call world use that really shape or more specific beliefs, both in religion and in politics. so, not going to do too much of this, but i want to show you one of the charts. i don't try in this book to make an elaborate case where every single thing that i say, what i am trying to do is paint a broad landscape of what is wrong with in this country the walleye the population and congress's polarized and why that leads to congressional gridlock. let me do this first. this chart has been called the essentials chart for understanding, you know, the consequences that our budget conundrum are causing. what it shows is as of may 2011, this is done by the center for budget policy and priority based on cbo numbers. this shows the price of the annual deficit due to the board -- wars, the bush-era tax cuts to recovery measures. that means primarily the bush stimulus and the obama's stimulus pro
CSPAN
Feb 17, 2013 3:30pm EST
about religion and politics, and how so many of the views that we believe are carefully roped -- reasoned and thought out, are grounded in deeper attitudes, deeper values, deeper life experience-what i call world views, that really shape our more specific beliefs both in religion and in politics. so, i'm not going to do too much of this but i want to show you one of the charts. i don't try in this back to make an elaborate case for everything i say. i try paint a blood landscape why the population and congress is for alreadyized and why that it that leads to congressional gridlock. let me do this first. this chart has been called sort of the essential chart for understanding the consequences that our budget conundrum. it shows in may 2011 -- doesn't by the senate for budget policies and priorities based on cbo numbers. this shows the parts of the annual deficits that are due to the wars in iraq and afghanistan, and the bush era tax cuts, recovery measures -- that means primarily the bush stimulus and the obama stimulus programs -- t.a.r.p., fannie and freddie, and the economic
CSPAN
Feb 23, 2013 8:45am EST
think or don't think about religion this politics and -- in politics and how so many of the views that we believe, all of us, are carefully reasoned and thought out are grounded in some deeper attitudes, some deeper values, some deeper life experiences, what i call world views that really shape our more specific beliefs both in religion and in politics. .. the essential chart for understanding the consequences of our budget conundrum. what it shows is as of may of 2011, the center for budget policy and policies and priorities, based on cbo numbers, this shows part of the annual deficits that are due to the war in iraq and afghanistan, the bush era tax cuts, recovery measures, that means primarily the bush stimulus and obama stimulus program and the economic downturn, you can still make it out and you can see from where we are today in 2013 at the time this was put together the single biggest factor in the annual deficits that we will experience over the next several years, not from the economic slowdown but because of the revenues that were taken away by the bush tax cuts. as we a
CSPAN
Feb 23, 2013 4:30pm EST
had been misused. history, like many religions, is multi vocal. that is, it is valuable. can be interpreted and deployed in ways that consciously, strategically or not simply suit the interests of the interpreter . so history can be useful. it can also be misused and even abused, but by scholars and practitioners. .. he had a sensationalist view of history. there was a novelty in the present moment. example includes the recent book "smuggler nation: how illicit trade made america." hijacking is a pretty sensational term to me. so how do peter andreas do it in this book? well, i think that he skillfully avoids in providing this present perspective. the other extreme that there is nothing new under the sun. i think this is most clear in the balance chapter, there is a subheading that is quite telling. so some things are new. for example, some of them do have greater global reach even if the extent of this reach has been exaggerated by the journalist and people of hollywood. it is indeed probably larger than it used to be historically. and there is also a relative share of illic
CSPAN
Feb 17, 2013 1:00pm EST
of religions. >> guest: i would woo say at it more complex. i find these a clash of civilize and other concept related to this rather simplistic, and by now, ten years -- more than ten years after 9/11, we should be aware of the complexity of what is happening on the ground abroad where america is involved in various wars. i final that many of these conflicts are rooted in the clash already taking place before 9/11 between central government and the tribes and communities on their borders, on the areas between states. so, therefore, without an understanding of local culture or history, it's impossible to implosion immiss stick notions. i know we here in the united states sigh this as a class of civilization but talk to one? iran or yemen and they will just look aghast at the concept there's a clash of civilizations. 90% of the survey had no idea what 9/11 was or who osama bin laden was. so, of there, we have to be very careful of how we are analyzing the contemporary world, and i maintain there's a crisis already existing in those parts of the world that the united states has now drifted into
CSPAN
Feb 20, 2013 9:00pm EST
] it was all very emotional. never mentioned. [inaudible] put me in jail or barred my religion. so it was hard for me to give up my citizenship. the land behind me. is it great to be an american? and don't know. >> we open the book with a vivid scene for 1968. just flown to reno nevada to get a quickie divorce in the days before no-fault divorce, very, very difficult to get a divorce back then. it had to be someone's fault, and it was not easy. she came back was in a bit of a state. she drove her car directly into the middle of downtown d.c. the morning after the night martin luther king was assassinated in this city, they just exploded. the 1960's in 1968 was a time of major turmoil and change in the that states, and it was also a huge time of change in your life because you get -- you did something that was difficult, you get a divorce after a very long marriage. it was the time when the women's movement was really beginning to get under way in the united states. i was impressed that you were not inspired by the women's movement. it was something else. [inaudible] >> said to a lot of reading
CSPAN
Feb 20, 2013 10:00pm EST
is insufficiently respectful of religion despite its religious heritage and most elite academia in america. they don't present the free enterprise side of economics. or to keynesian. they are quasi-socialist. rusher agreed with all of that. but i think the greater affinity with buckley can be seen in buckley and his brother-in-law, brent purcell's 1964 book in which they save mccarthy has been a little too rough. he's made errors of judgment, but that causes really important and is being treated unfairly. that's exactly where rusher is a 1954, 55, 56. and here's her for he turns from the generic republican republicanism too hard movement conservatives them. there is a bit of a conservative movement before national review in 1955, but it was a little -- it was disorganized. the polite term might be entrepreneurial, individualistic whittaker chambers cited as the people popping out by kravitz. you never knew where they were coming from, where they were going. you might see this again now and then. rusher is thrilled to hear there is going to be a conservative weekly magazine. at the time its weekly. s
CSPAN
Feb 16, 2013 9:15am EST
in that because all so globalization and religion and economics coming together to complicate it. if you are talking about the divisions that cause people to start thinking like enemies, still very much with us. [applause] >> i want to thank taylor branch for being with us tonight. he will be signing books in the library. i want to thank the livingston foundation for sponsoring this lecture and it anybody in california is listening please -- we could really use it. thank you very much. [applause] >> for more information visit the author's website taylor branch.com. >> to take booktv is in savannah, ga. for live coverage of the savannah book festival starting at 10:15 eastern with nobel prize winner and former vice president al gore on the future. 11:thirty-fourth and eighty psychologist heidi squire craft on rule number 2, lessons i've learned in a combat hospital. at 1:30 cnn's chief washington correspondent jake tamper on the war in afghanistan from the outpost. 2:45 presidential historian kevin thomas on ike's glove. at 4:00 pillage a prize-winning historian gerri willis asks why prie
CSPAN
Feb 18, 2013 8:30pm EST
was also interested in spreading religion and stuff, primarily it was about spices. why were spice is so valuable that it? well, it wasn't just that food was terrible in europe at the time. and it was. but each new exotic spice was thought to have certain properties. it might make you feel a bit more brandy, passionate but this? each of these new spices were kind of the viagra of the day. all right? so that is one of the reasons why this became so valuable. so after the conquest and colonization, the fed made a fortune exporting drugs back to europe. i drugs i mean sugar and many people consider a drug, it's where we get rum from. definitely drug, coffee, tobacco, and of course aphrodisiacs spices. so these things became the developmental engine for hemispheric development. think about where we are today, washington dc, virginia, maryland, these were all drugs back in that time. a lot of these drugs were introduced back to europe and people look at them with revulsion. tobacco, why would you put fire and smoke into your mouth. coffee was a death penalty offense in many states for many re
CSPAN
Feb 16, 2013 10:15am EST
by their religion, their skin color, their financial status or anything like that, but to accept them for who they are. i'm guilty of having what i like to call the small town complex. coming from a small town, i've got it. but it's where you think your world's only this big and that's how it is because that's what you were taught. i'm 24, and i know that's not the case anymore. but really, i mean, we always do that. we as humans are so fast to judge one another without really getting to know one another for what they are. so i definitely think it's something we could all take, take to and listen to. so anyways, we were stationed in northeastern afghanistan in a place called as jr. man, it's in the kunar province right on the pakistan border. and this is where i would be stationed with lieutenant john sovereign, gunnier is cent -- expubl and doc leighton. doc leighton was a navy corpsman, but they might as well be marines, so i'm going to cull him a -- call him a marine from here on out. [applause] so part of my opportunity was getting to meet these guys and getting to develop our team. becau
CSPAN
Feb 17, 2013 8:30am EST
in the rye." and, of course, there was poetry. i had more than one teacher whose religion was elliot's four quartets. and we learned attitude from yates and from the greek anthology. we wanted to come proud, open-eyed and laughing to the tomb. and i loved this epitaph of an ancient greek sailor. it's in a greek anthology translation by dudley fitz, wonderful teacher. tomorrow the wind will have fallen, tomorrow i will be safe in harbor, tomorrow, i said, and death spoke in that little word. o stranger, this is the nemesis of the spoken word, bite back the daring tongue that would say tomorrow. we marveled at keats' ability to imagine what it would feel like to be a billiard ball rolling across a smooth table. we hungered for lives that had the emotional range of shakespeare's sonnets. and if we were going to be saved, we knew it would be by literature. and it was the french historian jules membership lay who put it best for me as i tried in my mid 40s to turn to biography, to life writing. history, he said -- and you could think that he meant to include biography and fiction -- history, he
CSPAN
Feb 18, 2013 8:30am EST
and spreading the religion and stuff, but primarily he was about spices. why spices? why were spices so valuable back then? it wasn't just that food was finish in europe at the time -- food was terrible in europe at the time before all these things in the new world, and it was, but all these spices, each new, exotic spice was thought to have certain properties. they might make you feel a bit more randy, how should i put this? each of these new spices were kind of the viagra of the day, right? so that's one of the reasons why this trade became so valuable, and people risked their lives to explore these things. so after the conquest and kohl in iization, the settlers made fortunes exporting drugs back to europe and consuming them within this hemisphere as well. and by drugs i mean sugar -- which many people consider a drug -- where we get rum from, definitely a drug, coffee, tobacco, tea, and, of course, these afrotease yak spices, right? and so these things became the developmental engine for hemispheric development. right? vast fortunes were created. think about, you know, where we are today, wa
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17